Many Are Delighted When They Discovered The New Milo Plant Base Chocolate Drink

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Deanna Rivera in Life style

Last updated: 12 March 2020, 04:39 GMT

Our favorite Nestlé’s chocolate and malt powder MILO unveiled a plant-based alternative. The vegan friendly alternative has been created in response to more Aussies turning to dairy alternatives.

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The product from Nestlé was added quietly in Australian supermarket, however many people have started noticing it and posting their excitement online.

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This Vegan friendly chocolate drink is made from zero animal ingredients, they remained their original ingredients- malt, barley and cocoa, and instead of using milk powder it was replaced to soy protein isolate and soluble corn fibre, with less added sugar.



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Most importantly, it retains nutrients like iron, zinc and vitamin B12 which may be limited in some other plant-based diets. This is alongside calcium, vitamin D, B2 and B3.

It is recommended to add three teaspoons to hot or cold soy milk. Later on, Choice Australia made a poll on twitter on how you make your Milo. Which way would reigned supreme?

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Either you chuck the milk in first and then the delicious, chocolatey mix or vice versa. Interestingly it was the 'Milo on the Bottom' who won the majority.

That means Milo mix in first then your liquid of choice and then mixing it around with a spoon.



People have replied to the results, with one-person writing:

"You put it in the bottom with a dash of hot water to dissolve it, then put in the milk."

Another added:

"Bottom, but with a little bit of hot water to help melt it into the drink. Top is just asking for a Milo spoon sneeze in a cup."

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A third said:

"Bottom. Anything else is unAustralian."

A Nestlé spokesperson confirmed to the NZ Herald the product won't be hitting the New Zealand shelves until early May 2020.

In Australia, The AU Review said a 395g tin costs $7.30.






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